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We very often get requests of all kinds for pediatrics.

  1. Do you do it? (Yes)
  2. What kind of conditions can you treat?
  3. How old do my children have to be?
  4. My child doesn’t like needles…

All of these questions of course are very natural for a protective parent to ask. As parents ourselves, we find it quite natural. But we need to emphasize one point here: if you’re asking us you already know the child needs some kind of care, and if you’re not getting it from western biomedicine, or have trust issues there, you won’t get to see results until you bring your child in.

Taken below: pre-treated wart in a 2 yr old, next to it is the same child, no wart, treated solely with Chinese Medicine for 1 month, no dermatologist.

Before with Wart
post treatment, no wart now

As parents, our job is to protect and to screen, but as we find in veterinary medicine, it is the anxieties of the parent that create anxieties for the children. They pick up on themĀ subconsciously.

In China, much of our medicine is actually performed by Grandma or Grandpa in the home. But over here, it’s a big mystery, and so reservations are normal and natural; but also they may be a bit reactionary or reveal deeply held suspicions about other cultures.

Family is so ingrained in their culture it is part of the Medicine itself. The Five Elements, for example reveal a intricate balance of power between mother and grandmother as to how the son is raised, revealing how ancient China viewed the home’s power base. In the home, maternity ran the show. That seems true even in America today whether it is a single mother or not.

In China, much of our medicine is actually performed by Grandma or Grandpa in the home. But over here, it’s a big mystery, and so reservations are normal and natural; but also they may be a bit reactionary or reveal deeply held suspicions about other cultures.

Family is so ingrained in their culture it is part of the Medicine itself. The Five Elements, for example reveal a intricate balance of power between mother and grandmother as to how the son is raised, revealing how ancient China viewed the home’s power base. In the home, maternity ran the show. That seems true even in America today whether it is a single mother or not.

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China and Family

Chinese Culture emphasizes family values. The terrors of the Cultural Revolution by in large were government sponsored lunacy that ripped family structures apart for a generation, in an attempt to drive historical sense and wisdom from the hearts of the People and keep them from denying the ideology of a false Marxist doctrine that amounted to nothing more than China’s latest dynasty. It wasn’t Communism at all, that’s just the propaganda.

But the family values of Chinese Culture go all the way back to the Shang Dynasty 3000 years before Christ, and had revolved around the Odes, Rites, and later, the Analects of Confucius ever since (click to download these).

Also, many people do not know that recently in the late 20th, the PRC revoked the one child mandate, and has in fact stepped up efforts to curb child obesity and fight ADHD issues. And as many saw in the Olympics, they have no problem teaching children to be responsible, disciplined, and coordinated even to perform in front of the whole world.

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The Pediatric medicine was therefore really more likely rooted in maternal traditions, even as it came to be later that medicine women were replaced by male doctors. But children themselves haven’t changed much. They still fear needles, and they still prey upon the power-struggles of parents, grandparents, and yet are often as mold-able as clay.

Conditions Treated by Modern TCM

One of the biggest challenges of modernity is “new” diseases. Things like ADHD and Autism just did not exist in old world cultures. Such children weren’t labeled with a disease because it wasn’t commonplace, they were known as simpletons or “touched” or the “village idiot,” which we now know is not reflective.

In most of these cases they were treated with deficiency as a basis, with limited success.

However, when Western Medicine and culture entered China, and newer diseases began to be identified, a lot of other TCM theories that had existed were now used to discuss real physical issues in Pediatrics. Fast forward 100-200 years and modernity has created a plethora of unique, difficult cases.

With limited success TCM itself can treat things like ADHD, autism, Chorea, etc… and with great success can and always has treated the majority of childhood diseases like fever, asthma, eczema, Chicken Pox, measles, mumps, rubella, scarlet fever, croup, whooping cough, cold/flu, heat stroke, and psychiatrics1.

But when combined, our diagnostic tools, our treatment of the individual rather than the disease, and our knowledge of nutrition and use of detoxification can enhance those things we do not treat well.

For example, in one case the child presented with EXTREME ADHD, insomnia, mania, and fright. Through our case management, within two treatments it was discovered the child was on 50% more anxiety dosage than was recommended by the pharmaceutical company and was creating a side-effect condition known as Akathisia. Most of that condition’s symptoms mimic ADHD or amplify it. The parent was able to get the meds changed and 90% reduction of symptoms followed. So our education and broad knowledge helped the patient to manage their child2.

Modalities Used

Children, for good or bad, typically fear needles. Whether because of mom and dad or because of boosters/vaccines and how painful they can be.

Typically in TCM we do not start a [small] child with acupuncture, but instead Shoni-Shen, which is a mild version of gua sha (often used with toy cars), plum-star (which we do not perform), or herbs. Herbal tinctures are a pleasant and quick way to get the child into seeing the acupuncturist. Because ADHD & autistic children respond to physical touch well, we have found Tuina to also be very therapeutic for children, who come in with a surprising gamut of stagnation and knots in backs and shoulder from school work and posture.

What do I – the Parent – need to know?

  1. Typically, for children over age 5, we do not allow the parent to watch the treatment, so after intake, they must leave the room. See comments below.
  2. They must sign a Consent to Release to co-manage the case with a doctor.
  3. Other than that there aren’t any limitations.
  4. We are also required, by law, to do any mandatory reporting. In most cases we will try to talk to the parent first, but if there is something that is seen by anyone licensed under the medical board as a) neglect, b) abuse, or c) suicide risk, we must report to an authority. Typically Social worker or therapist.
  5. We also encourage parents to bring children in when they are starting to get sick, do not wait several days because children’s diseases progress 2-3 times the rate of an adult, and can be more dangerous in terms of fever3. Be sure to ask about our Family Packs.
  6. You may want to look into having, at home, a Chinese Herbal First Aid Kit, and taking one of our “Affordable Home Remedy” courses to start using pediatric folk medicine in your own home.

Thank you once again for reading,

Shifu Ramon Careaga

 

 

 

Contact Info

3720 Willow Ridge Rd, Lexington, KY 40514
859.533.0914
info@bluelotushealth.com

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